The Slow Death of Vintage Skills

http://imperfectlyhappy.com/the-slow-death-of-vintage-skills/

This author begins by exploring why a particular scene in a show has remained on her mind for an entire day, the scene is a woman being told that her bobbin lace in antiquated.

“Skills like knitting, sewing, cooking from scratch, canning, gardening and, yes, making bobbin lace seems to belong to a bygone era”

From there this author begins to explore how education began, at the mother’s knee with the children involved in all aspects of everyday life to one extent or another.  Food preparation has fallen by the wayside, including canning, baking bread from scratch, etc.  Sewing, knitting, crochet, embroidery, etc. this author laments not learning these skills when she was younger at her grandmother’s knee.  Gardening gets a mention also.

“BUT!  I see a revival!!!  Homeschoolers.  Backyard Farmers.  Crafters.  Survivalists.
Homesteaders.  These movements are growing and beginning to cross paths.  They are cool, hipsters, conservatives and hippies.  This “vintage revivalism” is gaining momentum.”

As people get more involved in understanding the health impact, and economic impact, of their choices in life they begin to go back to what was old.  I am really hoping that these skills are seen as valuable since Olean Public Library will be holding classes on them over the summer!

How to Use a Bead Loom: 10 Things You Must Know

http://www.interweave.com/article/beading/how-use-bead-loom-10-things-you-must-know/?utm_source=newsletter&utm_campaign=bd-tho-nl-170329-BeadingonaLoom&utm_content=932281_EDT_BD170329&utm_medium=email

  • Have all of the materials and tools you need on hand
  • warping the loom
  • adding the first row of beads
  • making sure that the tension is accurate
  • ending and adding threads
  • weaving in tails
  • removing the pieces
  • finishing techniques
  • etc.

Essentially this article is just a list of things that will be taught in a beading loom class that will be offered through interweave.

Abby Franquemont’s 3 Tips for Spinning Large Projects

http://www.interweave.com/article/spinning/3-tips-spinning-large-projects/?utm_source=newsletter&utm_campaign=spd-tsa-nl-170329-3-tips-spinning-large-projects&utm_content=932418_EDT_SPD170329&utm_medium=email

These are fairly common sense ideas, until you try to put them into practice.  1, have what you need at hand (she then elaborates that you don’t want to stop in the middle of everything to prep more fiber)  2, do a warm up spin, this sounds much like all of the advice to sample, sample, sample, etc.  If you are spinning for a project however, this is a good time to figure out how long it will take you to spin this fiber.  3, The last tip is to take frequent breaks.  This sounds counter productive until you consider how quickly you can become fatigued or bored doing the same thing over and over.  This would lead to inconsistency, which means that you have not only wasted your time but probably the fiber as well.

Very good tips to keep in mind when you are planning a project.

Yarnitecture by Jillian Moreno

Okay, when I say I read this, I do admit I did not read every word of every glossary and index found in the back. There were several really neat knitting patterns in this book. I enjoyed reading the tips, the graphics were wonderful, I have a much better grasp of how to spin fine after reading this book. I also have a much better understanding of what I am looking for in a knitting yarn and why yarn is spun in a particular manner. I think that if you are a dedicated knitter hoping to get into spinning this is certainly a book for you. If you are a spinner that wants to spin knitting yarn then read this book and watch the video ‘Spinning for Lace’ they both have great tips.
If you are a spinner that spins for fun and knitting is a very far back burner hobby, then this is not the book for you.
All in all an interesting read!

‘Back to the Future’ Inspires Solar Nanotech-Powered Clothing

https://today.ucf.edu/back-future-inspires-solar-nanotech-powered-clothing/

This is a really neat article that reminds me, we are truly living in an age of innovation.  Everything from Stainless Steel fiber for spinning yarn to copper filaments to weave with technology is becoming such a part of every day life.  I love that old things and new things are interacting and interlacing in such amazing ways to create brand new things.

This article talks about a copper filament that is being created that can be woven into fabric.  Even more exciting this filament captures solar energy and can store it like a battery.  The future might include charging your cell phone by walking down the street on a sunny day.  Perhaps even charging your car, or making money as you take a walk and release the stored energy back into the grid.

These are fascinating times!  Thanks to all of the researchers that work hard to create these amazing innovations!

Things We Love, Baby Blankets

http://www.interweave.com/article/weaving/things-we-love-baby-blankets/?utm_source=newsletter&utm_campaign=wt-tsa-nl-170215-ThingsWeLove-B&utm_content=922163_WE170215B&utm_medium=email

This is a good, short, article that reminds the reader that weaving (or anything) for a baby has more considerations than for any other type of person.  I know when crocheting for babies there are certain patterns that I look at and all I can think of is the baby getting their little fingers and toes stuck in all of the holes!