5 Knitted Shawl Patterns for People Who Don’t Like to Wear Shawls

https://www.interweave.com/article/knitting/5-knitted-shawl-patterns-classic-knit-shawls/?k=Z4TU9k51HQPZ7E7tpc5gHD%2BEBLk%2FKMQWPWrbm7q01XA%3D

This author, while promoting a new book, is expounding upon the virtues of different ‘new’ shawl patterns.  This article mentions everything that I have a hard time with when it comes to shawls.  The way shawls slip off, they way that they involve a ton of yarn overs, the fussy look, the awkward way that they fit, and so much more.

This article shows five different patterns and explains how each pattern ‘solves’ one or more of the problems mentioned.  They look really neat and certainly make me want to consider the book for my libraries collection.

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Is Amazon Getting Too Big

https://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/news/2017/06/26/amazon-getting-too-big/103144054/

A lot of what this post seems to be discussing is a possible monopoly that Amazon might represent.  Apparently, to provide savings to Amazon customers they are imposing very strict regulations on their distribution partners. Since Anti-Trust laws protect the consumers rather than the sellers they do not seem to apply to Amazon.

There also seems to be a trend that as you become used to the ‘Prime ecosystem’ you tend to go for that retail outlet more than any other.  This article is attributing 52% of book sales to Amazon, 18.3% of the apparel and accessories market, <1% of the grocery market, 40% of streaming video consumers, etc.

*I do see that this can be an alarming trend.  Even though they are now good for consumers as they begin to gobble up other providers then they are able to raise their prices to an astronomical amount.  Right now other online outlets like Jet and Walmart.com are trying to combat this trend with some degree of success.*

Thirteen Reasons Why Censorship Won’t Help by Amy Diegelman

http://bookriot.com/2017/05/30/thirteen-reasons-why-censorship-wont-help/?utm_source=Sailthru&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=062617%20What%27s%20Up%20in%20YA?&utm_term=BookRiot_WhatsUpInYA

This article begins in a fascinating manner, where an individual who is staunchly against censorship admits that a book disturbed her enough that she had to carefully consider her opinions.  The book in question almost seems to romanticize/justify a suicide.

Ultimately she realized that pulling the book would not end the behavior.  The behavior was a result of a deeper question/problem that needed to be addressed.  Banning books, restricting access, etc. are just band-aids; short term solutions that allow us to ignore the “Gaping wounds” in a community.

I cannot agree more.  There are so many problems, mostly in my opinion, due to a sense of entitlement and lack of communal feeling, that society is broken right now.

How Do You Get Teens Interested in Classical Literature by Lucas Maxwell

http://bookriot.com/2017/05/28/get-teens-interested-classic-literature-blind-date-book/?utm_source=Sailthru&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=062617%20What%27s%20Up%20in%20YA?&utm_term=BookRiot_WhatsUpInYA

Blind Date with a Book, 19th century edition.  In addition to reading the books, or knowing what they are about enough to create a 2-3 word ‘catchy synopsis’ wrapping these books in butcher paper would probably take the most time.

The author used Canva to create bookmarks for the event, Canva is a very easy to use tool that I had forgotten I knew about.  Now I plan on making sure that everyone I know is aware of it!

The librarian did a 30 second blurb about each book, to give the students an idea of what to expect if they read that book. When the librarian let the students take the paper off some of the students were excited!  Some were disappointed and she allowed those students to make some swaps.  They then held a contest to see who read the most (page count not titles).

This sounds like a really neat way to introduce literature that people would not ordinarily read.  I wonder if the director would go for this among staff in the public library I work at?